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"It was a work of art. It was better than that. It was a work of craft.” --Terry Pratchett "Reaper Man"

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

— 1 hour ago
Scandinavian Folk Motifs

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

— 17 hours ago with 4 notes
petitepointplace:

Traditionally 24 September was the day on which harvesting began in medieval England.  Calling the Mare As the last of the crops are gathered in, there used to be a lovely ceremony called ‘Calling the Mare’. The farmers all wanted to prove that they had the best reapers, so they tried to gather in the last of their crops before the neighbouring farmer did.  The last sheaf of the harvest was used to make a rough mare shape and it was quickly sent round to any farmers who had not finished gathering his crops. It was a way of saying to the farmer that wild horses would be after his crops, if he didn’t gather them in quickly. The men would run round to the neighbouring farm, throw the mare over the hedge into the field where the other farmer was working, and they would shout ‘Mare, Mare’ and then run away.  The farmer, who received the mare, would then have to work quickly to see if he could finish before another farm did, then he would throw the mare to them. The farmer who was last to finish had to keep the mare all year and have it on display so that everyone knew he had been the slowest farmer of that year.

http://www.projectbritain.com/year/september.htm
http://ludophono.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/calling-the-mare/

petitepointplace:

Traditionally 24 September was the day on which harvesting began in medieval England.

Calling the Mare

As the last of the crops are gathered in, there used to be a lovely ceremony called ‘Calling the Mare’. The farmers all wanted to prove that they had the best reapers, so they tried to gather in the last of their crops before the neighbouring farmer did.

The last sheaf of the harvest was used to make a rough mare shape and it was quickly sent round to any farmers who had not finished gathering his crops. It was a way of saying to the farmer that wild horses would be after his crops, if he didn’t gather them in quickly. The men would run round to the neighbouring farm, throw the mare over the hedge into the field where the other farmer was working, and they would shout ‘Mare, Mare’ and then run away.

The farmer, who received the mare, would then have to work quickly to see if he could finish before another farm did, then he would throw the mare to them.

The farmer who was last to finish had to keep the mare all year and have it on display so that everyone knew he had been the slowest farmer of that year.

http://www.projectbritain.com/year/september.htm

http://ludophono.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/calling-the-mare/

— 19 hours ago with 20 notes
orplid:

Camille Pissarro (Danish-French, 1830-1903) - 'La Récolte' / 'The Harvest'

orplid:

Camille Pissarro (Danish-French, 1830-1903) - 'La Récolte' / 'The Harvest'

— 20 hours ago with 8 notes
elyssediamond:

Fascimile of September: Harvest
Limbourg brothers
Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry1412-1416
Musée Condé, Chantilly, France
(click on the image to view in high resolution)

elyssediamond:

Fascimile of September: Harvest

Limbourg brothers

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

1412-1416

Musée Condé, Chantilly, France

(click on the image to view in high resolution)

— 20 hours ago with 23 notes
heaveninawildflower:

'Harvest Mouse' (circa 1890's) by Richard Lydekker (1849-1915 ). Plate from 'The New Natural History.'
Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery.

heaveninawildflower:

'Harvest Mouse' (circa 1890's) by Richard Lydekker (1849-1915 ). Plate from 'The New Natural History.'

Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery.

— 20 hours ago with 24 notes
graveyarddirt:

Autumn Maiden, by mermaidmessenger (via Etsy)
AUTUMN MAIDEN in a acorn dress with a paisley apron. She’s dancing in the fall moonlight. A purple cabbage patch with white rabbits and a pumpkin patch with lively squirrels make this a delightful autumn scene. In the distance a handsome scarecrow and a forest full of fall trees. A thin pale pink boarder with red roses surrounds the scene. Then comes Indian corn corners and thick orange boarder with purple asters and acorns.

graveyarddirt:

Autumn Maiden, by mermaidmessenger (via Etsy)

AUTUMN MAIDEN in a acorn dress with a paisley apron. She’s dancing in the fall moonlight. A purple cabbage patch with white rabbits and a pumpkin patch with lively squirrels make this a delightful autumn scene. In the distance a handsome scarecrow and a forest full of fall trees. A thin pale pink boarder with red roses surrounds the scene. Then comes Indian corn corners and thick orange boarder with purple asters and acorns.

— 20 hours ago with 12 notes
Scandinavian Folk Motifs

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

— 1 day ago with 4 notes
Scandinavian Folk Motifs

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

— 1 day ago with 2 notes
Slavic earth goddess, Mokosh, at Harvest.

by John McCannonGoddess of the earth worshipped by the ancient Slavs; one of the most primeval deities in the pagan Slavic pantheon. Mokos is most likely a later and more strongly personified variant of the Slavs’ elder earth goddess, “Damp Mother Earth,” or Mati syra zemlya. According to Roman Jakobson and Marija Gimbutas, the worship of such a primal earth goddess was widespread among the Slavs and their neighbors; this is attested to by the fact that the earth deities of a number of Baltic, Phrygian, and Finno-Ugric peoples exhibit similar characteristics and seem to derive from the Indo-Iranian Ardvi Sura Anahita (“Humid Mother of the Earth”). Just prior to the conversion of the Eastern Slavs to Christianity, Mokos was worshipped officially in Kievan Rus, along with Perun and other deities mentioned in the Primary Chronicle.As the only female god of note to be worshipped by the Slavs, Mokos assumed a broad range of divine roles. She was first and foremost a symbol of the earth’s fertility. During the early spring, it was taboo to spit on or strike the ground, since Mokos was said to be pregnant then. Holidays were dedicated to her in the autumn, after the harvest. The belief that Mokos invested the earth with divinity was reflected in peasant practices that, in some parts of Russia, Ukraine, and Belorussia, persisted into the 19th century: the swallowing of a lump of soil to consecrate wedding vows, the placing of earth upon one’s head to seal oaths, the confession of one’s sins to a hole in the ground instead of a priest.Over time, Mokos became a patron of women, especially those bearing children or giving birth. She oversaw women’s work, such as spinning and weaving. By some groups, such as the Czechs, her name was invoked in times of drought. She was also thought to protect flocks of sheep. The strength of her cult remained substantial, even after the Christianization of the Slavs; as late as the 17th century, Orthodox priests attempted to uncover Mokos-worshippers among the peasantry, asking women whether or not they had “gone to Mokos.” In Russia, Mokos was partially absorbed into Orthodox worship, in the guise of St. Paraskeva-Piatnitsa (“Paraskeva-Friday”), whose name day fell in late October, around the time of Mokos’s former harvest celebration.

Slavic earth goddess, Mokosh, at Harvest.

by John McCannon
Goddess of the earth worshipped by the ancient Slavs; one of the most primeval deities in the pagan Slavic pantheon. Mokos is most likely a later and more strongly personified variant of the Slavs’ elder earth goddess, “Damp Mother Earth,” or Mati syra zemlya. According to Roman Jakobson and Marija Gimbutas, the worship of such a primal earth goddess was widespread among the Slavs and their neighbors; this is attested to by the fact that the earth deities of a number of Baltic, Phrygian, and Finno-Ugric peoples exhibit similar characteristics and seem to derive from the Indo-Iranian Ardvi Sura Anahita (“Humid Mother of the Earth”). Just prior to the conversion of the Eastern Slavs to Christianity, Mokos was worshipped officially in Kievan Rus, along with Perun and other deities mentioned in the Primary Chronicle.
As the only female god of note to be worshipped by the Slavs, Mokos assumed a broad range of divine roles. She was first and foremost a symbol of the earth’s fertility. During the early spring, it was taboo to spit on or strike the ground, since Mokos was said to be pregnant then. Holidays were dedicated to her in the autumn, after the harvest. The belief that Mokos invested the earth with divinity was reflected in peasant practices that, in some parts of Russia, Ukraine, and Belorussia, persisted into the 19th century: the swallowing of a lump of soil to consecrate wedding vows, the placing of earth upon one’s head to seal oaths, the confession of one’s sins to a hole in the ground instead of a priest.
Over time, Mokos became a patron of women, especially those bearing children or giving birth. She oversaw women’s work, such as spinning and weaving. By some groups, such as the Czechs, her name was invoked in times of drought. She was also thought to protect flocks of sheep. The strength of her cult remained substantial, even after the Christianization of the Slavs; as late as the 17th century, Orthodox priests attempted to uncover Mokos-worshippers among the peasantry, asking women whether or not they had “gone to Mokos.” In Russia, Mokos was partially absorbed into Orthodox worship, in the guise of St. Paraskeva-Piatnitsa (“Paraskeva-Friday”), whose name day fell in late October, around the time of Mokos’s former harvest celebration.

— 2 days ago with 21 notes
#harvest  #autumn equinox  #mabon  #mokosh  #slavic  #mythology  #folklore mythology holidays 

The Anglo-Saxon Work Calendar
The secular picture cycle known as the ‘Labours of the Months’ is found in two Anglo-Saxon manuscripts. The earlier of the two (BL Cotton Julius A. vi) was written and illuminated probably at Christ Church, Canterbury, in the early eleventh century. The later of the two (BL Cotton Tiberius B. v) was written and illuminated probably at the Old Minster, Winchester, in the second quarter of the eleventh century.

Illustration originally from Saxon and Viking, EK Milliken, 1949.

The Anglo-Saxon Work Calendar

The secular picture cycle known as the ‘Labours of the Months’ is found in two Anglo-Saxon manuscripts. The earlier of the two (BL Cotton Julius A. vi) was written and illuminated probably at Christ Church, Canterbury, in the early eleventh century. The later of the two (BL Cotton Tiberius B. v) was written and illuminated probably at the Old Minster, Winchester, in the second quarter of the eleventh century.

Illustration originally from Saxon and Viking, EK Milliken, 1949.

— 2 days ago with 16 notes
#september  #harvest  #calendar  #anglo saxon  #folklore mythology holidays 
Scandinavian Folk Motifs

Scandinavian Folk Motifs

— 2 days ago with 2 notes
"Even a lone tree could be the focus of rituals, as is shown by a find from Froso church in Jamtland (Hildebrandt 1989). People there in the 9th and l0th centuries deposited parts of animals around a large birch, which originally stood in the middle of a burial ground surrounded by mounds. At the foot of the birch were bones of bear, elk, and red deer, but also pigs, sheep/goats, and cattle. The birch can be interpreted as a special sacrificial tree, representing the world-tree at the centre of the world. The place-name shows that the tree and the rituals around it were chiefly associated with the god Freyr."
Behind “Heathendom”: Archaeological Studies of Old Norse Religion
ANDERS ANDRÉN
Scottish Archaeological Journal
Vol. 27, No. 2 (2005), pp. 105-138
Published by: Edinburgh University Press (via graveyarddirt)

(Source: charlottesarahscrivener, via goadthings)

— 2 days ago with 57 notes
#folklore and mythology  #folklore mythology holidays 
My current piece “Harvest Moon Mandala.”  The motifs are mostly central European, with the exception of the apple trees in the border, which are Palestinian.

My current piece “Harvest Moon Mandala.”  The motifs are mostly central European, with the exception of the apple trees in the border, which are Palestinian.

— 2 days ago with 6 notes
#cross stitch  #needlepoint  #folk art  #pagan  #harvest moon  #pomegranate  #grain  #apple tree  #corn  #september  #embroidery  #textile  #fibre  #petite point place my personal projects